3D Racing Games Mania

The construction and graphics of computer games have evolved amazingly in the last decade mainly due to the development of better, more powerful computer hardware components that could support the kind of racing games the developers had in mind. Although most of the famous car racing games have been in 3D for years, if you search the worldwide Internet you can find some very funny, very interesting smaller 3D racing games.

A small, funny 3D racing game that you can play by yourself of with multiple players using LAN is a game where you have to race against seven opponents. No cars, no boats, no vehicles of any kind, just you, a couple of maps, the desert or jungle and your six opponents. Among other interesting 3D racing games you will find Freeride Thrash where you race against the computer in a spaceship that takes you flying through tunnels or sliding around twisted tracks. It is a very fun racing game to play and if you try your very best maybe the computer won’t beat you.

Have you ever raced in a barrel? Well, here’s your chance! The list of funny 3D racing games continues with this twenty levels racing game that has you rolling down the highway at amazing speed. The goal is not to touch the sides of the road and crash into as many enemy cars as you can find.

But, in the end, 3D is most appreciated when power vehicles are racing so the Aquadelic 3D power boat racing game designed especially for the 2005 Becherovka Game contest has to be present on this list of 3D racing games. This racing game comes in single player as well as multiplayer versions. In the single player version you race against the computer and only one of the four different power boats is available to you. However, if you win you can unlock the other three. There are three different types of racing in single mode: you can race opponents (no more than three), you can race against the best time of an opponent or you can freestyle. In multiplayer mode this racing game can be played by four players at the most and they can only race or freestyle.

Even though the 3D racing games involving power vehicles are much more popular, there are still some smaller, creative 3D racing games that can be a lot of fun to play.

Supermarket Mania 2 Game Review

Nikki and her friends are back in Supermarket Mania 2! Help her uncle Ross manage and run his chain of grocery stores on the other side of the country. Keep the supermarket shelves stocked up, floors clean and customers coming as you work on improving the stores and increasing profits. It’s not all peachy though, as the evil Assistant Torg and his robotic minions are back causing trouble. Can you handle the pressure?

The game begins as Nikki (that’s you!) sits back to relax after the original Supermarket Mania, where she successfully managed a grocery chain that beat a competing store run by robots under the direction of the evil Assistant Torg. Nikki’s Uncle Ross in Tinsel Town heard about her success, and invited her over to help expand his supermarket empire. As Nikki and her friends pack their bags and head off to the west, Assistant Torg is just a step behind, intent on causing trouble and sabotaging Nikki’s business!

Supermarket Mania 2 is a fast-paced time management game, similar to the popular restaurant management games such as the Diner Dash series. However, instead of seating and serving dining customers, Supermarket Mania 2 requires you to maintain a well-stocked, clean and efficient grocery store for your shopping customers. You have to do most of the work though; you have to refill empty shelves with stock from the storeroom, mop up the dirt, ring up the cash register and ensure the shopping baskets are available. And that’s only the first level!

There are over a dozen shelves in your supermarket, and each is stocked with different kinds of groceries, from roast chicken and cheese to milk and bags of chips. You need to keep each shelf stocked; otherwise your customers wanting an out-of-stock item will start to get impatient as they wait for you to restock. Thankfully, restocking is just a matter of clicking on a shelf, and Nikki will roll her cart to it and fill it up. Cart empty? A click on the storeroom and Nikki will zip in with her cart to refill it.

However, the game is not just about keeping the shelves full and watching your customers walk around. You also need to be at the cash register when customers want their orders rung up. When a customer wants items that need preparation – such as a milkshake or a croissant – you will have to prepare it. Getting the milkshake ready will require you to collect some milk and ice cream, bring it to the milkshake machine and wait for the drink to be processed. You also need to serve “drive-through” type customers. If a customer pops up at the window, you’ll have to run through the store collecting their order for them. And if the place starts to look dirty and grimy, clicking the mop will have Nikki spend the next few seconds cleaning up the place.

There are also a variety of customers who will frequent your stores. Each of them has a different set of goods they are likely to buy, and each of them has their own personalities and quirks. For example, the little old ladies will take their time walking around the place and will most likely buy sausages and fish, while the college geeks will head for the bags of chips and can just stand there being distracted by their gadgets.

Certain customer types can also cause problems. The little girls on their scooters will make a mess of the place and knock goods onto the floor if you don’t notice them in time. Luckily, you just have to notify the security guard, and they’ll keep the little devils under control. And then there’s the evil Assistant Torg and his robots. They’ll also cause trouble for you, sneaking into the store and sabotaging machines that will require you to spend precious time repairing.

There are also special levels in the game with special conditions and objectives. For example, there is a milkshake level where you have a huge milkshake sale and all your customers are here to buy milkshakes. Your goal will then be to see how efficient you are at getting the milkshakes made and sold before the customers start becoming too impatient with waiting. There are also the various upgrades you can buy between levels, similar to other time management games. You can upgrade each shelf to stock more goods, upgrade the bakery to bake more croissants each go, and install radio and TV so that your customers will be entertained and less likely to lose their patience. There are plenty of other upgrades as well.

Supermarket Mania 2 is a really fun time management game that surpasses the original. The gameplay is interesting, and doesn’t feel like a chore or a whole bunch of constant mindless clicking. The graphics and music are also vibrant and pleasant. You are guaranteed to spend hours enjoying this game. If you liked time management games such as Cooking Dash or Farm Frenzy, you will love Supermarket Mania 2.

Rating: 4.0/5.0

All Star Mania – The Best of The Best, With Some Worst Thrown In

“It’s all about the All Stars.”

It’s the sort of proclamation you’d expect to hear from Fox Sports baseball announcers Jack Buck or Tim McCarver during their coverage of the MLB All Star game. Each year around this same time in early July, baseball mania reaches a fever pitch, as the best baseball players – arguably, in the world – come together for two days to entertain fans with 450 ft. home runs, 100 mph fastballs and two dream teams comprised of the brightest young stars of the future playing alongside the biggest names of the past 20 years.

The All Star baseball stage is a unique one in all of professional sports, if for no other reason than it’s the only venue which gets to enjoy the sports spotlight in the absence of any other competing sports events. With basketball and hockey seasons mothballed for the summer, and football still several weeks shy of training camp, All Star baseball is the only professional game in town for sports enthusiasts in early July. Even Major League Baseball itself shuts down for almost a full week to acknowledge and shine a light on its own event. Thus for this brief period each year, it truly is all about the All Stars. But that’s not where I heard that statement.

Little Leagues, Big Expectations

If you’ve ever coached Little League baseball, as I have for many years, you’d be familiar with the annual process of “drafting” teams. Before the beginning of each season a group of presumably well-intentioned volunteer coaches – aka parents – meet at their local recreation hall after work and pick team rosters from a general list of enrolled players. I have found that it can be a stressful experience since I’ve usually entered this meeting with a few personal goals in mind: 1) I need to draft my kid’s best friend, 2) I need to make sure I remember to draft my own kid, 3) I need to draft a kid whose dad is known to help out, 4) I need to avoid drafting the rambunctious kid, 5) I need to avoid drafting the kid whose parents are jerks, and 6) It would be nice to draft at least one kid capable of throwing a few strikes. The game is less painful when we keep walks-per-inning under 10.

Fortunately, my own personal experience with “draft night” hasn’t been all that bad. I’ve seen the occasional disagreement over the selection of players (e.g., “Mrs. Smith asked me to pick Johnny, so we can car pool together.” Oh, are you sure it has nothing to do with Johnny being 5’11” and throwing 72 mph fastballs?). But for the most part the meetings were uneventful and just terribly long.

But I remember one specific draft night, which was attended and coordinated by one of our town’s Little League Committee members. At the end of the three-hour meeting, as we were exiting the conference room and still joking about who had picked whom, this committee member leaned over to me and whispered, “These regular season drafts don’t mean anything anyway. It’s all about the All Stars.” Bingo.

The Boys of Summer

As big as the MLB All Star extravaganza is, the Little League All Star season creates a mania that’s, quite literally, in a league all its own. The media attention and commercialism surrounding the Little League All Stars is unrivaled in youth sports. The Little League website even termed it, “one of the summer’s most popular sporting events.” And they may be justified in stoking the publicity with that claim. After all, Little League and ESPN are in the 6th year of an 8-year contract that will televise 66 games on either ESPN or ABC in August. Those are pretty big stakes, especially for a bunch of 11-and-12-year-old kids playing America’s pastime.

So it’s no wonder that in small towns and hamlets all across America, the mania begins in earnest several months earlier when some of the more overzealous “coaches” – dads – are already entertaining visions of ESPN grandeur even before the first child has been assigned to a roster for the regular season; a roster, by the way, that’s filled predominantly with kids who will never even think about their town’s All Star teams, let alone play on one.

If any of your town’s youth sports organizations are managed by a mentality that believes “it’s all about the All Stars,” or that equivalent thinking, then it’s time to advocate a change in that group’s leadership. To say “it’s all about the All Stars” is to say it’s all about a few kids, and not all of the kids. And this flies in the face of what the experts and prevailing wisdom on youth sports suggest, which is that below age 14, it should be all about inclusion and fun.

Two All Star Games – One Blowout, One Blowup

This year’s MLB All Star game was played in Kansas City on July 10th. That game ended in a blowout with the National League winning 8 to 0. Ironically, on that very same day, another All Star game was played in Columbus, Georgia between two Little League teams vying to advance in the tournament. That game ended with parents arguing, then starting a fistfight, and then two dads being arrested and charged with disorderly conduct. I guess to them, it was truly “all about the All Stars.” A little too much so.

The lesson for us all here should speak for itself. No, the majority of us are not so overzealous and unrestrained that we end up punching out the opponent’s parents at a Little League All Star game. But even the most restrained of us is probably dangerously close to losing perspective as we try and enjoy our child’s participation in youth sports. So just remember, even when you’re watching the Little League World series on ABC this August, youth sports should never be “all about the All Stars.”