Long Ball Mania

The games of baseball and softball are being ruled by the use of the metallic bats. The winner of any game in this new space age of the composite metal bat is held in suspense until the very final out and the fat lady has finished her tune.

Long Ball Mania is the vogue, the happening, the in thing, and without it the game has no drama.

The metal bat in its beginning was to be a godsend for the sport as an economic measure for longer lasting bats eliminating the preponderance of broken wood bats. “Well and good,” said the Wizard Of Oz for he was a grand follower of the game and he thought wonderful now we have no more broken bats.

Little did the world know with the introduction of this new battle stick called our Aluminum baseball bat or softball bat that many things would change and develop out of hand.

Surely if the sound when hitting a ball was different there must be other differences also so testing proved true changing to metal bats changed the physics of bat meeting ball. We not only had a new sound “Ping” we learned if we changed the composition of the metals used the flexible elasticity of the bat changed.

The space age development of composition metal bats quickly changed from a standard aluminum to bats with out of this world new materials that really made little baseball fly from the bat like a missile shot.

Not only did the “Ping” turn to “Zing” it has grown to the point of injury and deadly force concerns. Notwithstanding the health issue due to elasticity and mathematics of equal and opposite forces of this (Ball Exit Speed Ratio) BESR Certification formulation let us talk “Sweet Spot.”

The new age of Composite Metal Bats enlarged the sweet spot of the bat considerably up and down the length of the bat. Hitters are no longer having to be precise with the control and swing of the bat to have the bat meet the baseball ideally on the bat in a smaller area we call the “Sweet Spot.”

Now in our game of baseball or softball with bats designed and loaded up with a much increased area called this sweet spot and the physical elasticity of material these composite bats have changed the entire nature of our games of baseball and softball.

In days of yore very few players were capable of slamming the ball over the fence on any given time at bat. Good folks stand by for in the games of the future any player or at any time at bat have at his or her command and in their hand a (battle stick) bat capable of putting the ball up and over the outfield fence or should we say into orbit beyond the stadium walls.

The newer composite space age metallic bats now used Little League, High Schools and Colleges in both baseball and softball have brought about a Long Ball Mania “Zinging and Pinging.”

Aiport Mania – First Flight – Game Review

Airport mania first flight is another in the series of hectic action games, however, this time you find yourself in the seat of an air traffic controller. This time it is flights at risk, so you better have your brain well in gear and your clicking finger to the ready.

In all airport mania levels you have a bird’s eye view of a runway, and your goal is to be a successful air traffic controller, so that means effective landing, loading, refuelling and everything in-between.

Like all games that offer one, the only place to start is the tutorial. This tutorial is light hearted and will allow you to get to grips with the structure and of the game, without being dropped straight in at the deep end.

One of the main differences between this game and others like it is the ability to gain combos. The higher your combo ranking the more money you will receive. Remember though do the job effectively before you do it quickly, never the other way around.

On this game the planes are colour coded and this helps to direct them into their gates. If you have two purple planes on the ground and only one purple gate, then you can store the other purple plane in the waiting area, this will delay the rate at which it becomes unhappy. Remember it is not only the passengers that get upset the planes do too!

When you get into the game itself, you will see four targets, to progress through the levels you will need to reach the basic target at a minimum. On top of the basic target you have the expert, master and supreme targets, the higher you get the more money you earn.

Just like an airport there will also be different types of planes, some are content to remain on the ground for a long time, others get impatient remarkably quickly, it is imperative that if you want to score highly you deal with grumpy planes quickly.

Of course with all games in this genre, you can upgrade specific items. One of the essential upgrades in airport mania brings you more waiting areas. This might not look imperative at the level you are on but you have to think ahead.

When you complete a stage all of your upgrades will disappear, however, unlike your upgrades you do carry your money over, so if you find that you may be able to complete the next level without an upgrade then do not get one for the sake of it, keep your money in the bank and you will have an easier task at a later stage.

Like many of the other time management games, you will find that you do not get bored in a hurry, and this is always an exceptional quality for games to have. There are a lot of points I have not even begun to uncover in this review, these are just some of the fundamental points that will help you along the way. The only way to become an expert at a game like this is practice, so what are you waiting for?

All Star Mania – The Best of The Best, With Some Worst Thrown In

“It’s all about the All Stars.”

It’s the sort of proclamation you’d expect to hear from Fox Sports baseball announcers Jack Buck or Tim McCarver during their coverage of the MLB All Star game. Each year around this same time in early July, baseball mania reaches a fever pitch, as the best baseball players – arguably, in the world – come together for two days to entertain fans with 450 ft. home runs, 100 mph fastballs and two dream teams comprised of the brightest young stars of the future playing alongside the biggest names of the past 20 years.

The All Star baseball stage is a unique one in all of professional sports, if for no other reason than it’s the only venue which gets to enjoy the sports spotlight in the absence of any other competing sports events. With basketball and hockey seasons mothballed for the summer, and football still several weeks shy of training camp, All Star baseball is the only professional game in town for sports enthusiasts in early July. Even Major League Baseball itself shuts down for almost a full week to acknowledge and shine a light on its own event. Thus for this brief period each year, it truly is all about the All Stars. But that’s not where I heard that statement.

Little Leagues, Big Expectations

If you’ve ever coached Little League baseball, as I have for many years, you’d be familiar with the annual process of “drafting” teams. Before the beginning of each season a group of presumably well-intentioned volunteer coaches – aka parents – meet at their local recreation hall after work and pick team rosters from a general list of enrolled players. I have found that it can be a stressful experience since I’ve usually entered this meeting with a few personal goals in mind: 1) I need to draft my kid’s best friend, 2) I need to make sure I remember to draft my own kid, 3) I need to draft a kid whose dad is known to help out, 4) I need to avoid drafting the rambunctious kid, 5) I need to avoid drafting the kid whose parents are jerks, and 6) It would be nice to draft at least one kid capable of throwing a few strikes. The game is less painful when we keep walks-per-inning under 10.

Fortunately, my own personal experience with “draft night” hasn’t been all that bad. I’ve seen the occasional disagreement over the selection of players (e.g., “Mrs. Smith asked me to pick Johnny, so we can car pool together.” Oh, are you sure it has nothing to do with Johnny being 5’11” and throwing 72 mph fastballs?). But for the most part the meetings were uneventful and just terribly long.

But I remember one specific draft night, which was attended and coordinated by one of our town’s Little League Committee members. At the end of the three-hour meeting, as we were exiting the conference room and still joking about who had picked whom, this committee member leaned over to me and whispered, “These regular season drafts don’t mean anything anyway. It’s all about the All Stars.” Bingo.

The Boys of Summer

As big as the MLB All Star extravaganza is, the Little League All Star season creates a mania that’s, quite literally, in a league all its own. The media attention and commercialism surrounding the Little League All Stars is unrivaled in youth sports. The Little League website even termed it, “one of the summer’s most popular sporting events.” And they may be justified in stoking the publicity with that claim. After all, Little League and ESPN are in the 6th year of an 8-year contract that will televise 66 games on either ESPN or ABC in August. Those are pretty big stakes, especially for a bunch of 11-and-12-year-old kids playing America’s pastime.

So it’s no wonder that in small towns and hamlets all across America, the mania begins in earnest several months earlier when some of the more overzealous “coaches” – dads – are already entertaining visions of ESPN grandeur even before the first child has been assigned to a roster for the regular season; a roster, by the way, that’s filled predominantly with kids who will never even think about their town’s All Star teams, let alone play on one.

If any of your town’s youth sports organizations are managed by a mentality that believes “it’s all about the All Stars,” or that equivalent thinking, then it’s time to advocate a change in that group’s leadership. To say “it’s all about the All Stars” is to say it’s all about a few kids, and not all of the kids. And this flies in the face of what the experts and prevailing wisdom on youth sports suggest, which is that below age 14, it should be all about inclusion and fun.

Two All Star Games – One Blowout, One Blowup

This year’s MLB All Star game was played in Kansas City on July 10th. That game ended in a blowout with the National League winning 8 to 0. Ironically, on that very same day, another All Star game was played in Columbus, Georgia between two Little League teams vying to advance in the tournament. That game ended with parents arguing, then starting a fistfight, and then two dads being arrested and charged with disorderly conduct. I guess to them, it was truly “all about the All Stars.” A little too much so.

The lesson for us all here should speak for itself. No, the majority of us are not so overzealous and unrestrained that we end up punching out the opponent’s parents at a Little League All Star game. But even the most restrained of us is probably dangerously close to losing perspective as we try and enjoy our child’s participation in youth sports. So just remember, even when you’re watching the Little League World series on ABC this August, youth sports should never be “all about the All Stars.”